Planting Grass on Sloped Hills

Grass located on a sloped hill may have to survive runoff that causes soil erosion that limits the amount of nutrients that can get to their roots. This problem can be avoided with proper planting of turf. (Courtesy: Michael Coghlan at flickr.com)

Grass located on a sloped hill may have to survive runoff that causes soil erosion that limits the amount of nutrients that can get to their roots. This problem can be avoided with proper planting of turf.
(Courtesy: Michael Coghlan at flickr.com)

If you are living on a property that features a sloped hill, then you probably are aware how the slope affects the growth and appearance of grass. Due to the slope, there is a lot of runoff that can influence the quality of the grass. The runoff can cause soil erosion, which influences the amount of nutrients that can get to the roots of the turf.

However, there are things you can do during the planting process that can help to assure that the portion of your lawn that is located on a slope flourishes.

The first thing you need to realize is that creating a lawn using seeds won’t work on a slope. The seeds can be washed away in the water runoff and have difficulty-taking root. Expert lawn care specialists suggest that you use sod to develop the lawn. Moreover, using sod instead of seeds means that you can enjoy a new lush green lawn almost instantly.

Once you have decided what species of grass you want and you have purchased the strips of grass sod, then you can start work.

First, you need to remove the surface of all vegetation, weeds, rocks, and debris.

Second, you need to break up the soil down to a depth of about 6-inches to 8-inches with a shovel or tiller.

Third, fertilize the soil. Some experts suggest that you use 10 pounds of 5-20-10 fertilizer every 500 square feet of the hill’s surface. Spread the fertilizer evenly and mix it into the top 4-inches of soil.

Fourth, incorporate about two-inches of organic material into the soil. The material can include rotted manure or compost. Mix the material into the top 6-inches of the soil to enhance the soil structure of the hill. The procedure will also assure moisture stays in the ground and helps to enhance the amount of nutrients in the soil.

Fifth, lay the sod down across the surface of the soil. Configure each strip so that they face the top and bottom of the hill. This procedure will help limit the amount of water that will run down the hill and prevent the water from flowing under the strip and keeping it from washing out the soil under the turf.

Sixth, stick plastic garden stakes into the middle section of each sod strip to lock it on the surface of the hill and prevent irrigation and gravity from dislodging it.

Seventh, water the lawn once to twice a day every day for two weeks or when necessary so that the underlying soil stays moist. Doing this for two weeks will assure that the sod anchors to the slope. When this occurs, reduce watering to once every three days.

Eighth, remove the stakes from the sod after two weeks. By then the roots of the grass will be strong enough to hold the turf in place.

Ninth, enjoy your lush, green lawn.

About Robert Janis

Written by Robert Janis for LawnEq - Your specialists for Lawn Mower Parts and Small Engine Parts. We offer genuine premium OEM parts for Land Pride, Toro and many more dependable manufacturers.

Leave a Reply